5 Student Newspaper New Year’s Resolutions for 2013

Be productive. Find a point to pointlessness. And fool around a bit.  These are teasers from a few of the tips offered recently by student journalists. – As fall semester and this calendar year came to a close, editors, and columnists at campus newspapers nationwide earnestly reflected on lessons learned, experiences undertaken, and dreams that […]

SUNY Oswego Journalism Student Threatened with Suspension Over Email to Hockey Coaches

Officials at SUNY Oswego recently threatened an international journalism student with suspension and campus banishment over emails he sent to hockey coaches while working on a class assignment. The 30-second gist, according to Gawker and FIRE: Australian native Alex Myers currently studies journalism and works in the Office of Public Affairs at SUNY Oswego. For a class assignment requiring “a feature on a public figure,” he selected the school’s hockey coach Ed Gosek. As part of his info gathering legwork, he emailed the hockey coaches at Cornell University, Canisius College, and SUNY Cortland requesting their feedback on Gosek. The email contained two faux pas– one major and factual and the other more minor and stylistic. First, Myers identified himself as a SUNY Oswego public affairs staffer, not a student. Second, he urged the coaches, “Be as forthcoming as you like, what you say about Mr Gosek does not have to be positive.”

The New York Times, Trend Stories, Student Drinking & Fake IDs

In a trend story published in The New York Times last week, freelance reporter Courtney Rubin focused on the changing drinking habits of undergrads in the social media age. The morning after the piece’s posting, these apparent trends took a backseat to the factual errors embedded within it. As the high-profile student-run blog IvyGate first revealed, six Cornell University seniors appearing in the feature– the article and an accompanying photo– apparently do not exist. In the latest episode of our College Media Podcast, the Center for Innovation in College Media’s Bryan Murley and I discuss this journalistic slip, its link to trend stories and parachute reporting, and the increasing fearlessness of student media to challenge what they view as incorrect or illegitimate journalism.