The weekly podcast spotlights big college media news, standout student press work and tons of innovative tech tools. Click on the image above to listen in.

Princeton Newspaper Editor-in-Chief: ‘It’s Hard Being a Student Journalist These Days’

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The “most contentious critics” of The Daily Princetonian at Princeton University are not alumni, faculty, administrators or other professional staff. They are Princeton students.

According to outgoing editor-in-chief Marcelo Rochabrun, ‘Prince’ staffers faced a range of retaliatory words and actions over the past year simply for practicing quality journalism and sharing, umm, you know, the truth.Inline image 1 Read More

‘An Attack on Free Speech': Student Media Respond to Charlie Hebdo Shootings

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Student journalists and student media in the U.S. and Europe have begun responding en masse to the deadly attack in Paris.

The fatal shootings inside the newsroom of the provocative satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and the subsequent suspect manhunt and hostage situations have attracted global media attention. It has been reported that the shooters were seeking revenge on Charlie Hebdo for its cartoons depicting the Islamic Prophet Muhammad in unflattering poses and sacrilegious situations.

In editorials, interviews and blog posts, student editors have expressed sympathy for the slain magazine staff while simultaneously reflecting on related issues involving freedom of expression, satire, journalist safety and the “predictable backlash against Islam at large.” Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: ‘Teach Me How to Hobby’

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

Dear Dan: Should College Media Publish the Controversial Charlie Hebdo Cartoons?

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3Dear Dan is a CMM series featuring perspectives and advice on serious and quirky college media issues of the moment. Most installments include a question or quandary submitted by a student journalist, professional journalist, journalism professor or student press adviser.

Dear Dan: With the global spotlight currently shining on the shootings in Paris and the provocative publication Charlie Hebdo, should student newspapers and other college media publish or post the magazine’s more controversial covers and cartoons? Read More

10 Standout Student Press Stories: Booze, Meat, Millennial Myths & a Wheelchair Test

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with.
In that spirit, this semi-regular CMM rundown spotlights some of the most impressive, engaging and offbeat content recently produced by college media worldwide. Along with being worth a read, the stories are also potentially worth emulating or using as inspiration for awesome storytelling at your own school. Read More

‘Fast-Paced Work & Long Nights': An Insider’s View of Washington State’s Student Newspaper

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What’s it like to be part of The Daily Evergreen team at Washington State University?

According to a fun-errific new short documentary by WSU student Herman Meier, it’s a smile-inducing, stress-filled, über-professional experience awash in coffee, fact-checking, layout, occasional 4 a.m. fires, colorful piñatas, Santa hats (presumably around Christmastime, but one doesn’t want to assume), awards, corndogs, inside jokes, fake mustaches, intra-staff dating, pizza, memories of a bygone era when the pub featured “pink polka-dot boxes around stories” and what appears to be a Jesus bobblehead. At one point, the WSU Cougar mascot also stops by to pose for photos and just hang out. Read More

Top Journalism Conferences to Attend in 2015

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Below is a list of the most indispensable regional, national and international conferences and workshops in 2015 for individuals practicing, teaching, advising and studying journalism.

They focus on a variety of skill-sets and media and cover both the educational and professional sides of the field. They are listed here in chronological order. (To have your get-together featured, email me ASAP.) Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: Mid-College Crisis

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

College Football Playoff: How did Student Media at Alabama, FSU, Oregon & OSU Fare?

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The Ducks dominated. The Buckeyes surprised. The Seminoles squandered their streak. And the Tide lost their air of championship inevitability.

The College Football Playoff’s on-the-field action was certainly fun and frenetic (and interrupted by too many commercials for “The Wedding Ringer”). But how did campus media fare? Specifically, how did student media at the four schools involved in the first-ever CFP cover last night’s semi-finals/bowl games shebang?

Here are a few early awards and initial thoughts. Read More

Editor-in-Chief of The Crimson White Student Newspaper at University of Alabama Resigns

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Deanne Winslett, editor-in-chief of The Crimson White student newspaper at the University of Alabama, resigned suddenly last week.

According to the paper, health issues involving her family was the main impetus behind Winslett’s decision. As she told CW staffer Katie Shepherd, “I think that my attention is just split too much, and so I think it just made sense to resign at this point in time.” Read More

Student Journalists Debate Police Brutality, Bias & Body Cameras

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Amid the riots, die-in protests and investigations nationwide centered on police brutality and racial bias, one option increasingly offered as a potential solution: body cameras.

“When an officer approaches a citizen with no camera, he can be many things: a protector, an inquisitor or a thug,” University of Alabama senior Nathan James writes for The Crimson White student newspaper. “But when an officer knows that both his actions and the citizen’s actions will be subject to review, he becomes something else entirely. He becomes what he was intended to be — an arm of 
the law.”

Student journalists have engaged in an increasingly spirited debate in recent weeks about the ins-and-outs of police cameras — including privacy questions, related costs, proper implementation and the benefits they may or may not provide. Read More

20 Science Journalism Tips, Myths, Rules, Tools & Sources of Inspiration

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By Leigh Anne TiffanyCMM correspondent

During a session at the 2014 ACP/CMA National College Media Convention, Henriette Löwisch dispelled, upended and beat back a few of the sillier and more serious stigmas surrounding science journalism. She also offered aspiring science journalists some sound advice.

Löwisch’s perspectives and words of wisdom are backed by years of related reporting and research and from the vantage point of her current well-respected post — journalism professor and director of the Environmental and Natural Resource Journalism graduate program at the University of Montana.

As her ACP/CMA conference session description stated, “Science stories should be an integral part of your college publication, and they don’t have to be boring. Discover the human side of scientific research and take away tricks on how to translate jargon into plain English.” Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: ‘Big Talk’

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

2014 College Media Year in Review, Part 4: ‘Poking Fun at an Inherently Funny Topic’

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Along with financial woes, technological reboots and excellent editorial work [see parts one, two and three], college media 2014 has been filled with free press and free speech heroes — including Oklahoma University student Joey Stipek and The Oklahoma Daily campus newspaper.

Stipek, the Daily’s special projects editor, filed a lawsuit last year calling for the release of the university’s parking ticket records — which he believed were public. The school stalled, until last month, when the Daily dropped an editorial bombshell across its entire front page: The paper was planning to join Stipek’s suit.

The school almost immediately caved, releasing the records. Administrators at Oklahoma State followed suit soon after. The bottom-line lesson, as the headline of a related Daily special report confirmed, “Students Speak, Change Happens.Read More

2014 College Media Year in Review, Part 3: ‘A Complete War Zone’

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Over the past year, along with reinventing and beating back evermore present financial challenges [see part one and part two], student media and student journalists inserted themselves into a number of hot-button national and international issues and events.

For example, during the 2014 Winter Olympics, the mastermind of the massively popular Twitter account and social media phenomenon @SochiProblems was a 20-year-old journalism student at Toronto’s Centennial College named Alexander Broad. Read More

2014 College Media Year in Review, Part 2: ‘Welcome to the Future of the Future’

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Along with reinvention [see part one], one other resounding trend among college media in 2014 was financial duress — and efforts to either beat it back or at least keep it at bay.

For example, facing an “apocalyptic threat” due to low cash reserves, The Daily Texan entered into a once-unimaginable partnership with the Moody College of Communications at the University of Texas at Austin. The Texan’s top editor at the time confirmed to readers that “the paper I’ve made the cornerstone of my college experience may never turn a profit again.”

After similarly failing to turn profits or secure needed student fees support, The Famuan at Florida A&M University, The Collegian at the University of Richmond and The California Aggie at the University of California, Davis, dropped their print editions. Read More

2014 College Media Year in Review, Part 1: ‘Go to Hell & Take the Print Newspaper with You’

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Roughly a month ago, Kyle Plantz agreed to shout strangers’ names in a newsroom for only $5.

Plantz, 20, a junior journalism major at Boston University, is not crazy. He’s passionate — about The Daily Free Press. In early November, the FreeP, the 45-year-old independent student newspaper at BU, launched a fundraising campaign to pay off a $70,000 debt and maintain some semblance of a print presence.

So what’s with all the shouting? As the paper’s editor-in-chief, Plantz promised to scream the names of everyone who donated at least $5 to the campaign — at random moments during production nights. Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: Movies in Class

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

Student Column Triggers Vandalism, Threats & Termination from Competing Campus Paper

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Before 2 a.m. last Friday, four young women entered an apartment complex near the University of Michigan.

Once inside, the anonymous quartet quickly donned oversized hoodies and proceeded to leave eggs, gum, uncooked hot dogs, a picture of the devil and handwritten notes containing vulgar asides and threats at the doorway of a UM student who wrote a campus newspaper column they apparently didn’t like. They then took photos of their handiwork and fled the scene.

College Fix calls the incident a hate crime. Read More

Adviser on Student Paper’s Online-Only Shift: ‘It’s Been a Roller-Coaster, Mostly Good, So Far’

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At the start of this past semester, The Columns at Missouri’s Westminster College reintroduced itself to readers as an online-only news outlet.

As I previously posted, the longtime student newspaper was forced to cut its regular print edition — and staff pay — due to a larger budget crunch impacting the student government and numerous campus groups at the liberal arts school. Columns adviser and Westminster English & Journalism professor Maureen Tuthill told local press last spring, “SGA’s budget was cut massively, and they’re dealing with some difficult situations, which we completely sympathize with. We’re just trying to figure out a way to stay alive.”

Its news-gathering operations have now been alive solely online for more than three months. How has the Columns 2.0 experience been going so far?

Given the massive print reductions and digital tinkering taking place throughout collegemediatopia, it’s a very pertinent question. Fortunately, Tuthill was kind enough to weigh in recently with some appreciably candid thoughts. Read More