The weekly podcast spotlights big college media news, standout student press work and tons of innovative tech tools. Click on the image above to listen in.

‘Who Gets a Press Pass?’: 5 Media Credentialing Challenges for Student Journalists

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How tough is it for student journalists to gain access to on and off campus events? When have they been denied a press pass or been granted one only after being subjected to uber-amounts of confusion or consternation about their student status? And how often do they simply give up before they have begun, deciding to not even ask for credentials because they’re flummoxed, intimidated or turned off by the process?

A high-profile new study of more than 1,300 journalists focused on “Media Credentialing Practices in the United States” had the potential to answer at least some of those questions. Alas, as Beatriz Costa-Lima reports for the Student Press Law Center, the otherwise fascinating survey does not include college journalists in the mix. Apparently, some students (unclear whether college or also younger) took part in the survey but not enough — so they were bumped to the “contributors or unpaid independent journalists” categories. Blah. Shrug. Grr. Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: Crowdsourcing Ideas for a Better Campus

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

Student Column on Friend’s Assault, Victim vs. Survivor Debate Triggers Backlash

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A column last month in The Daily at the University of Washington about a student’s assault and the subsequent difference between responding to it as either a “victim” or a “survivor” inspired an outsized helping of viral hate. It also prompted the student writer to reflect and admit “my own words betrayed me.” And it has spurred a dialogue among the Daily crew about the proper use and contextual meaning of victim-survivor terminology.

In her original column, “Don’t Play the Blame Game: Be a Survivor,” Daily arts & leisure editor Danielle Palmer-Friedman tells the story of an assault her friend suffered at the hands of her partner. Her friend reported the assault to police. She felt guilty about this. Initially, Palmer-Friedman felt that guilt was justified — she deemed the involvement of police as unnecessarily cruel to the friend’s partner.

Then, her friend opened up to her: “I was the one who was hurt. I should not be the one feeling guilty. I was wronged, and it wasn’t wrong for me to report it.” Boom. Cue an about-face. According to Palmer-Friedman, “The sudden conviction in [my friend's] voice made something click in my brain. … Although it is still difficult for me to fully comprehend why, I know that what [my friend] did by reporting the assault was not wrong.” Read More

Harvard Radio Station Receives Complaints: ‘I’ve Never Heard the F-word This Much’

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The Federal Communications Commission has received three obscenity complaints about Harvard University’s radio station WHRB (95.3 FM) since 2011, according to documents released last week responding to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. All the complainants found fault with WHRB’s airing of uncensored rap song lyrics.

As one individual explained to the FCC, “Lyrics that included the words motherfucker, nigger, fuck, bitches and other gratuitous language was broadcast uncensored. I attempted to call the radio station but the telephone numbers provided on the WHRB website went unanswered.” Read More

The Koretzky Challenge: Can You Cover Your Campus Better Than a ‘Team of Old Farts’?

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Ever the provocateur, college media maven Michael Koretzky is on a mission “to compel college journalists to take online seriously” — even if he has to embarrass them a bit along the way.

His immediate target: the University Press, the Florida Atlantic University student newspaper he has advised — officially, unofficially and around the clock — the past 16 years.

Koretkzy has started a new news site “for the express purpose of shaming the University Press into doing better with its own. How? Public humiliation. Because nothing else has worked. Not hand-holding, not cajoling, not even bribery.”

The outlet — slyly named Fautocratic — features what Koretzky calls “random acts of journalism against Florida Atlantic University.” Yet, a second tagline lays out its aim more clearly: “Covering FAU news until the UP does.” Yowza. Game on. Read More

College Media Geeks: Jennifer Waits, College Radio Reporter & Advocate

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I met college radio guru Jennifer Waits for a lunchtime chat last Friday in The Coop eatery at Haverford College, her alma mater. She told me to search for a woman wearing a black tote bag sporting KFJC. They are the call letters of the college-based community radio station where she DJs, a pastime she adores. In her words, “It’s an addiction. I have to DJ. … When you’re DJing to FM airwaves, you’re DJing into space. There’s no feeling like it.”

I’d caught Waits on a break from an all-day stint in the Haverford archives. She is piecing together the fascinating history of the college’s student radio adventures, which stretch back to the 1920s. Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: Student Pay Schemes

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

College Media Podcast: Dying Student Paper’s Last-Ditch Publishing Plan Raises Questions

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Welcome to the latest installment of the College Media Podcast. The CMP is a collaborative venture with Bryan Murley from the Center for Innovation in College Media.

The podcast’s aim: spotlighting big college media news, standout student press work and an array of helpful and innovative tips, sites, programs and tech tools. Read More

‘Our Journey’: Suffolk Student Digital Project Shares U.S. Immigrants’ Stories, Experiences

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Suffolk University student Daniella Marrero oversees a fascinating digital project aiming to share the stories of student immigrants — in their own words.

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Daniella Marrero, creator of “Our Journey”

The 19-year-old computer science major and journalism minor from Mission, Texas, said she was inspired to launch “Our Journey” after hearing about possible immigration reform.

“It was one of the very first instances when I actually felt a personal connection with something that my government was doing,” she says. “Growing up in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas, and being an immigrant from Mexico myself, I always heard powerful stories of families and individuals crossing the border to come to the U.S., at times risking everything they have or earned just to make it.”

From her perspective, the incessant political chatter about immigration’s economic impact and statistics involving immigration trends misses the point: the people involved.

“The U.S. loves numbers, but immigration is tied with stories and experiences that cannot be calculated on any formula,” says Marrero, the assistant international editor of The Suffolk Journal student newspaper. “I wanted people to listen to the personal accounts of actual immigrants, to connect with their struggles and desires, to stop thinking of such a crucial topic as another math problem we can solve and to give the opportunity for immigrants to speak up.” Read More

UGA Journalism Student Reflects on FOIA Battle, ‘Internet Storm,’ Secret Presidential Searches

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David Schick did not set out to be a free speech hero. He simply wanted some information.

A few years ago, Schick, a University of Georgia journalism student (one with strong opinions on 21st-century j-education) requested and posted some public documents on his personal blog. That was (Freedom of Information) Act 1.

(Freedom of Information) Act 2: State attorney general Sam Olens recently pushed for him to remove a portion of those docs because they contained the names of people who had applied a while back to be UGA president. As Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) rep and college media mentor extraordinaire Michael Koretzky put it, “That’s right, Olens doesn’t want you to know the names of people who applied for a job and didn’t get it.”

Read More

The Man Behind the Hurricane: 5 Tips from a Veteran College Media Adviser

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For the past seven years, veteran journalist Bob Radziewicz has advised one heck of a student paper. Along with directing the print and online journalism program at the University of Miami and overseeing the school’s SPJ chapter, Radziewicz has helped students kick butt, break news and name names in The Miami Hurricane.

If the quality of a college media adviser can be at least partially measured by the awesomeness of the outlet they advise, than Radziewicz (pictured below) is an A-lister within collegemediatopia. Bottom line, if you can’t yet tell, I’m a big fan. He’s moving on from UM soon. As part of the upcoming transition, I asked if he had a moment to share some journalism and leadership advice for advisers, editors and others in charge or in love with college media. He kindly consented.

So below are five tips from the man behind the Hurricane. Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: The Happiness Challenge

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

New Novel About College Media Written By Former Student Newspaper Editor

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She looked back into my eyes, saw the pain I felt and it looked like she could feel it herself as she looked on the verge of tears. Our mutual look into each other’s eyes lingered and for that reason I felt myself more vulnerable than I had in many years. Steadying myself, I collected my emotions, offering my hand in friendship. She graciously accepted  and leaned in to give me a gentle peck on the cheek. 

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Author John Guzzardo

The tender scene above is a snippet from the upcoming book The 38 Day Education by John Guzzardo. The novel from Solstice Publishing — set to drop early next month as an ebook and paperback – sports an honest-to-goodness student media focus.

As The Suncoast News reports, “The story . . . is told from the perspective of Jay Ferragamo, a college sophomore who is thrust into the role of editor of The Scope, only to learn the publication is almost completely broke. Ferragamo must navigate the treacherous waters of student government to gain the necessary funding to continue publishing. He must then seek justice after learning the newspaper’s finances were wrecked by pilferage by the daughter of one of the town’s most powerful families.”

Powerful family pilferage — OK, so it’s not the most common cause of college media censorship or funding strife. But it hopefully makes for one heck of a story. And the tale overall is based generally on the author’s own student newspaper days. In the mid-1990s, Guzzardo served as editor-in-chief of The Sou’Wester at Georgia Southwestern State University. Read More

College Media Podcast: The Columbia ‘Rapists on Campus’ Journalism Ethics Debate

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Welcome to the latest installment of the College Media Podcast. The CMP is a collaborative venture with Bryan Murley from the Center for Innovation in College Media.

The podcast’s aim: spotlighting big college media news, standout student press work and an array of helpful and innovative tips, sites, programs and tech tools. Read More

Cavalier Daily at UVA in ‘Critical Financial Condition,’ Needs Cash By Summer’s End

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The Cavalier Daily at the University of Virginia is in “critical financial condition,” according to the student newspaper’s alumni association. The paper’s current managing board describes it more neutrally as the latest development in “a constant season of change.” Either way, the pub needs an influx of cash, fast, to pay bills and reboot.

As the Cavalier Daily Alumni Association (CDAA) blog College Topics confirms, “The paper’s student leadership reports that they will be unable to pay their bills by the end of the summer without immediate financial support. As a result, the managing board has requested $15,000 from the Cavalier Daily Alumni Association to support the paper’s expenses for the summer and beginning of the fall — so that it may tailor the paper’s operations for a sustainable future.” Read More

Dartmouth Student Newspaper Special Issue Explores ‘Lives Affected by Sexual Assault’

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The Dartmouth student newspaper at Dartmouth College has put together a staggeringly insightful special issue spotlighting the “once-taboo subject” of sexual violence within higher education. Called “A Campus Facing Violence,” the issue purports on the front page to explore “the lives affected by sexual assault, the policy proposals that could shift the landscape and a college in flux.”

Dartmouth editors decided to publish this issue in place of the paper’s typical Green Key issue, which is created annually each spring in honor of a traditional party weekend at the Ivy League school. Read More

Funding Progress: ‘Social Media & Email Storm’ Helps Save Daily Egyptian From Ruin

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Somewhere in Iraq, Heidi Diedrich is smiling. So is Eric Jay Fidler in Illinois. The pair are joined in their joy by many others who sport past or present affiliations with The Daily Egyptian.

After more than a year of financial duress and a recent rejected effort to secure money to survive, the student newspaper at Southern Illinois University Carbondale suddenly has a much stronger chance of obtaining the funding that will keep it operating on all cylinders — and ensure it continues appearing regularly in print. After saying no to a student media fee proposal the first time around, the SIU Carbondale president changed his mind Friday. With the backing of his board of trustees chairman and some Illinois legislators, he lent his support behind a $9-per-student-per-semester fee to help the DE — placing it on the agenda for hopeful approval at next month’s board meeting. Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: The Freshman 16

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

State Funds May Save Daily Egyptian From Ruin; Special Issue Confirms ‘Clock is Ticking’

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In a special issue published last Friday, The Daily Egyptian at Southern Illinois University Carbondale slapped the hashtag #SavetheDE over its regular front-page flag. The main headline beneath the hashtag sums up the drama unfolding around the student newspaper in a way that would make Jack Bauer from Fox’s “24″ proud: “The clock is ticking.

As I have previously posted, the longtime SIU Carbondale campus pub has been on financial “life support for a year or so.” School officials recently decided not to approve a student media fee being sought by the staff “to combat rising deficits” in the budget and keep the paper in print. According to Daily Egyptian faculty managing editor Eric Fidler, without the fee, “It almost certainly means the end of the Daily Egyptian.”

But it may be lawmakers to the rescue — at least temporarily. According to a Chicago Tribune report, “State Rep. Kenneth Dunkin, D-Chicago, amended the state’s appropriation bill to the university on Tuesday to include a $70,000 contribution to the newspaper, The Daily Egyptian. The amendment passed the higher education appropriations committee on Wednesday.”

Translation: SIU Carbondale is a public university, so the state supports it with some taxpayer money every year. This legislator has shifted some things around to ensure that this support now includes $70K for the DE. Read More

Columbia Student News Site Fires Staff Writer After He Appears on ‘Rapists on Campus’ List

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A student news site at Columbia University is receiving attention and some criticism for reportedly removing a writer from its staff after his name surfaced on a much-publicized list of “Rapists on Campus.”

The list has appeared in various forms over the past week in random Columbia restrooms and classrooms — most often scrawled as graffiti or printed as a “rape list flyer” — spurring rampant speculation and increasing media coverage. It features the names of a small number of individuals labeled as “Rapists on Campus” or “Sexual Assault Violators on Campus.” The anonymous inscribing and dispensing of the list is being described as an act of desperation and defiance in line with growing student frustration over the university’s perceived passive or demeaning response to sexual violence on campus. Read More