The Student Journalist Adventure Series: Is It OK to Wear Pajamas While Interviewing a Source?

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The Student Journalist Adventure Series features perspectives and advice on serious and quirky college media issues of the moment. Most installments include a question or quandary submitted by a student journalist, journalism professor or student press adviser.

Question: If I’m conducting a phone or Skype interview with a source from my apartment or dorm room, is it OK if I’m just wearing pajamas and not a more professional outfit like I might wear if I was meeting them in person or could be seen via video? Read More

CMM Special Series: What Do Student Journalists Want to Learn More About Journalism? (Part 2)

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During his recent efforts to help plan programming for the fall 2015 ACP/CMA National College Media Convention — the world’s largest annual gathering of student journalists and their advisers and profs — David Simpson wanted to hear more from the students themselves. Specifically, he was curious: In these changing times, what do potential student attendees want to get most from a journalism conference experience? So Simpson, a revered veteran journalist and director of student media at Georgia Southern University, reached out to me with his student-first query. I in turn reached out to the summer 2015 CMM Editorial Fellows — an elite crew of current and recent student journalists.

For this CMM special series, 14 Fellows offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question: What topic, tech tool, news beat, skill-set or current event would you love to learn more about, lead a session on or help debate during a journalism convention? Their answers run the gamut — touching on everything from science journalism and Snapchat to sexual assault coverage and workflow management. Read More

CMM Special Series: What Do Student Journalists Want to Learn More About Journalism? (Part 1)

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During his recent efforts to help plan programming for the fall 2015 ACP/CMA National College Media Convention — the world’s largest annual gathering of student journalists and their advisers and profs — David Simpson wanted to hear more from the students themselves. Specifically, he was curious: In these changing times, what do potential student attendees want to get most from a journalism conference experience? So Simpson, a revered veteran journalist and director of student media at Georgia Southern University, reached out to me with his student-first query. I in turn reached out to the summer 2015 CMM Editorial Fellows — an elite crew of current and recent student journalists.

For this CMM special series, 14 Fellows offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question: What topic, tech tool, news beat, skill-set or current event would you love to learn more about, lead a session on or help debate during a journalism convention? Their answers run the gamut — touching on everything from science journalism and Snapchat to sexual assault coverage and workflow management. Read More

Toxic Mold & Alleged Student Press Censorship at Fairmont State University

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A set of stories about mold has spurred a fresh round of alleged student press censorship. The related administrative actions are so blatant and boorish one student editor has referred to them as “insanely unintelligent.”

Here’s the gist: The Columns campus newspaper at West Virginia’s Fairmont State University upped its aggressive reporting this past school year. Among the issues the paper subsequently brought to light was the presence of potentially toxic black mold in a few FSU buildings and residence halls. A follow-up story focused on a student with alleged health problems — including hives — stemming from the mold. Yowza.

In response to those reports and several others, in a series of moves Columns editors describe as retaliation, FSU officials cut some staff stipends, attempted to enact prior review, threatened the paper’s funding in general and purportedly sh*tcanned the Columns faculty adviser. Read More

At the Moment, Michael Williams May Be the Most Prominent Student Journalist in the U.S.

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At the moment, Michael Williams may be the most prominent student journalist in the U.S. — in large part due to an expected promotion he didn’t receive and a lawsuit which he has helped file.

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Michael Williams is managing editor of The North Wind at Northern Michigan University. He previously served the paper as a guest writer, staff writer and opinion editor.

Williams is managing editor of The North Wind student newspaper at Northern Michigan University. The paper has earned praise and increased attention this past academic year for enacting a more hard-charging and investigatory editorial style. At the same time, in the midst of rolling out a new university marketing campaign and perhaps unprepared for such scrutiny, some NMU officials have criticized the paper’s efforts as overly aggressive.

In late April, the North Wind Board of Directors removed NMU assistant professor Cheryl Reed from her faculty adviser role and rejected Williams’s application for editor-in-chief — even though he was the only candidate for the job. Reed and Williams have filed a lawsuit in response that is currently still pending. Read More

6 Things I Learned About Journalism & College Media from Jenny Surane at The Daily Tar Heel

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Over the past few weeks, CMM has featured a special series of posts from current and recent student journalists all centered on a single significant question: How do we get students to care more about college media?

This is the conclusion of the series — focused on the individual who inspired it, Jenny Surane. Read the full post below for details — including what I learned from Surane during a recent podcast chat.

Jenny Surane recently wrapped up a year-long stint as editor-in-chief of The Daily Tar Heel student newspaper at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The million-dollar media company boasts more than 250 staffers and over the past two semesters delivered a bevy of breaking news reports, special editions, impassioned editorials and large-scale investigations.

But did student readers notice? Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 19: ‘Dedicated to Reporting Social Justice Happenings’

An April 2015 Antithesis staff photo. Among those featured in the top row (l to r): Ana Miljak, Adriana Perhamus, Petra Zarah Jarrar and (far right) Rafaella Gunz. Bottom row: Joe Giacona and Thomas Blakeley.

In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 18: ‘The Secret in the Sauce’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 17: ‘Face the Uncertain Future of Journalism Head-On’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 16: ‘The Lessons I Learned About Audience’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 15: ‘Trying to Be People’s First Stop for News’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 14: ‘Involving the Community in the Process’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 13: ‘The Ways We Organically Attract Readers’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 12: ‘Focusing on Quality Rather Than Quantity’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

College Media Podcast: Kelly Bauer, The Northern Star, Northern Illinois University

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Kelly Bauer recently concluded a three-year stint as editor-in-chief and publisher of The Northern Star student newspaper at Northern Illinois University. To confirm, for those not in the loop on college media routines and traditions, a three-year EIC stint is a LONG time — making Bauer most likely the longest-serving student newspaper leader among the class of 2015. 

While NIU was not the top school on her college list, it definitely proved to be the right one for her. As she wrote in a recent farewell column, published less than a week before she graduated from the university: “If I’d had the money to attend Mizzou, I would have. That would have been an incalculable mistake.” Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 11: ‘Do the Best You Can With What You Have’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 10: ‘Why We Report What We Do’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 9: ‘The Generation Changing the News’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

Country’s Longest-Serving Student Newspaper Sex Columnist Quits, Cites ‘Particularly Biting’ Reader Comments

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The longtime writer of The Daily Barometer sex column at Oregon State University is calling it quits, citing increasingly mean-spirited reader feedback as the main reason for her decision.

Kathy Greaves, a human sexuality instructor at OSU for two decades and counting, has written the weekly sex-and-health-themed Barometer column “Ask Dr. Sex” for more than 15 years. She considers it “a service to the university.” This past semester alone, she wrote about topics ranging from oral sex, safe sex and anal sex to sex toys, calcified fetuses and sexual role reversal. Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 8: ‘Go Out and Play Scientist’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More