CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 11: ‘Do the Best You Can With What You Have’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 10: ‘Why We Report What We Do’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 9: ‘The Generation Changing the News’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

Country’s Longest-Serving Student Newspaper Sex Columnist Quits, Cites ‘Particularly Biting’ Reader Comments

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The longtime writer of The Daily Barometer sex column at Oregon State University is calling it quits, citing increasingly mean-spirited reader feedback as the main reason for her decision.

Kathy Greaves, a human sexuality instructor at OSU for two decades and counting, has written the weekly sex-and-health-themed Barometer column “Ask Dr. Sex” for more than 15 years. She considers it “a service to the university.” This past semester alone, she wrote about topics ranging from oral sex, safe sex and anal sex to sex toys, calcified fetuses and sexual role reversal. Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 8: ‘Go Out and Play Scientist’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

Student Journalist: ‘Your Campus Publication Should Make a Housing Guide’

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Northwestern University student Alex Duner is a journalist and developer at the Knight Lab and the webmaster for top-notch college media outlet North by Northwestern. This summer, he’s also part of the Interactive news team at The New York Times.

Under Duner’s watch, NBN recently premiered the latest version of its digital campus housing guide, a highly-trafficked and highly-treasured tool for Northwestern students. Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 7: ‘News the Way Our Readers Want to Consume It’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 6: ‘An Edge in the Algorithms’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 5: ‘The Job I’m Training for Will Always Exist’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 4: ‘For Me, Adaptability is Key’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 3: ‘Initiating a Complete Culture Shift’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press? 

Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 2: ‘That Hip, Instagram-Worthy Quality’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press?  Read More

CMM Special Series: The Future of College Media (How Do We Get Students to Care More?) Part 1: ‘A Makeshift Umbrella During a Rainy Day’

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In a recent farewell column published on Quartz, outgoing Daily Tar Heel editor-in-chief Jenny Surane at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote, “[I]t’s humbling to realize that the newspaper I spend so many hours working on isn’t really beloved by my peers in the same way. … My peers are interested in reading news, but they have no loyalties whatsoever about where it comes from. … Even some of my closest friends refused to pick up the newspaper I spent dozens of hours on each week.”

Her sentiments have been echoed in recent semesters by many students and educators connected to college media. Audience engagement is of course always an issue when undergraduates are involved. But the challenge of getting students to regularly check out their campus news outlets is exponentially increasing in an era cluttered with evermore competitors and platforms and bereft of old-media brand loyalty.

For this CMM special series, 20 current and recent top student journalists in the U.S. and Canada offer their perspectives, ideas and advice centered on a single question at the heart of college media’s future: How do we get students to care more about the student press? Read More

College Media News: Hacking, a Lawsuit Victory, a Book About Veterans & Examples of Student Press Crowdfunding Success

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Here’s a rundown of recent college media and journalism education news, a smidgen of student press history, some student journalist perspectives and a few funny headlines and tweets.

To pass along tips, stories, links and tweets for the next college media news rundown, email me ASAP.

New Editorial Adviser at UGA Student Paper. The Red & Black at the University of Georgia has hired a new editorial adviser. Longtime journalist and current UGA instructor Rebecca Burns was picked from more than 50 applicants. A portion of the story announcing her appointment: “Burns’ many years of experience as a reporter and editor — most recently the Deputy Editor of Atlanta Magazine — along with her work as a digital strategist put her at the top of the list, and those things alone do not begin to list her accomplishments. She has written three books and held a number of editor positions as well as Director of Digital Strategy at for Emmis Publishing and Communications.” (The Red & Black, University of Georgia) | A bit more about her via a Q&A last year (Politico) Read More

Otterbein U. Student Media Wins Lawsuit: Campus Police Records Must Be Made Public

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Otterbein University graduate and former Otterbein360 news editor Anna Schiffbauer is having a good day. This morning, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled in her favor on a longstanding lawsuit spurred by her request for access to Otterbein’s police reports.

For those just tuning in to this roughly four-year-old fight, it centered on a single question: Does a private university + “a public entity” = open records? Read More

The Best Student Newspaper Story I’ve Read So Far in 2015

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Sara DiNatale is the outgoing editor-in-chief of The Spectrum student newspaper and a recent graduate of the University of Buffalo. Over the past two semesters, she put together a powerful longform feature report on a former UB student whose life was upended after being convicted on child pornography charges and labeled as a level 2 sex offender. Read More

DePaul Student Newspaper to School: Stop Blocking Access to Campus Sources

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The DePaulia student newspaper at DePaul University is having trouble gaining access to important sources on campus and getting full answers to important questions when they do.

In a new editorial, the paper shared, “It’s difficult if not impossible to get the real information [staffers] need, often it’s just watered-down talking points. … The DePaul brand is a part of our brand, and we don’t want it to falter. But for any institution to function at its highest capacity, people must ask questions. At a university it can come from the students, it can come from faculty and it can come from journalists. If there’s nothing to hide, there’s no reason to hide.” Read More

Meet the Summer 2015 CMM Editorial Fellows

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The CMM Editorial Fellowship is aimed at ensuring the voices of student media leaders are amplified and regularly heard alongside those of journalism professors and professionals. The summer 2015 class of Fellows is comprised of an elite crew of current and former top editors and reporters at student media across the U.S. and in Canada.
The Fellowship seeks to provide these student journalists and recent graduates with a periodic platform to share a bit about their work and weigh in on major media news, tough ethical calls and the changing press and higher ed landscapes.
The first featured summer Fellows post should appear by week’s end or early next week at latest.

Read More

Old Dominion Student Newspaper Website Hacked by Group Protesting Killing of Muslims

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The Mace and Crown became the El Moujahidin for roughly 24 hours beginning Sunday night. Unknown vandals hacked the website of the Old Dominion University student newspaper, replacing its regular site with a single webpage sporting a black backdrop, a red skull-faced winged creature emblem and messages supporting Palestine and denouncing the killing of Muslims.

Upon learning of the site’s takeover yesterday evening, editors worked with the web hosting company GoDaddy to get the protest page removed — forcing them to also temporarily shut down the site. As of this posting, the site was not yet live and back to normal. In a brief statement released via a Google Doc, Mace and Crown editors referred to the individuals who caused this trouble as being part of “an Algerian hacker group.” Read More

College Media News: LSU By Drone, Evolution of UF’s Innovation News Center & Badger Herald for Life

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Here’s a rundown of recent college media and journalism education news, a smidgen of student press history, some student journalist perspectives and a few funny headlines and tweets.

To pass along tips, stories, links and tweets for the next college media news rundown, email me ASAP.

‘A Natural Next Step.’ The Badger Herald at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is going digital-first and weekly in print. Editor Tara Golshan: “Three years ago, we were printing a newspaper five days a week, but we knew this wasn’t what our readers wanted. Moving to two print editions a week allowed us to re-think what the paper should be; not just telling students what the news is but why it matters to them. Our move today is a natural next step.” (The Badger Herald, University of Wisconsin-Madison) Read More