The weekly podcast spotlights big college media news, standout student press work and tons of innovative tech tools. Click on the image above to listen in.

Lantern at Ohio State Making Major Print Cuts, ‘Evolving Into More of a Digital-First Product’

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The Lantern student newspaper at Ohio State University will reduce its print presence in three major ways starting in the fall. The cutbacks are a response to decreases in print advertising revenue, a drop in reader pick-up rates and a declining educational focus on print newspaper work.

As Lantern editor-in-chief Liz Young reported yesterday, the paper’s most visible reduction will be to its print publishing schedule. Come fall, the pub will appear on and near OSU’s campus twice weekly instead of four times per week — with an extra edition printed each Friday before a Buckeyes home football game.

In addition, the size of each print issue will shrink slightly. And the number of printed copies for each edition will drop by more than 30 percent — from 14,000 to 9,000. Read More

Arizona State J-School’s Takeover of PBS Station in Phoenix ‘Has Game-Changing Potential’

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The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University just announced it is adding a crown jewel of epic proportions and three very well-known letters to its kingdom: PBS.

According to USA TODAY, “Starting next Tuesday, the j-school will own and operate Eight, Arizona PBS, the PBS outlet in Phoenix, the nation’s 12th-largest media market. It will take over news and public affairs programming on the station’s three TV channels and its website. And, more intriguing, the school will offer the station as a venue for professional news outlets to experiment as they try to reinvent journalism in the digital age.” Read More

Should a Reporter Cover the GOP, Politics if He Interned with Obama During His Student Days?

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Should students’ past internships impact their journalism work and the areas they report on?

Some factions of the conservative press are howling a resounding yes, while lodging criticism at The New York Times for allowing a recent Princeton University graduate with a politically-tinged and Democrat-leaning internship history to report on the GOP. Read More

College Media Geeks: Sarah Kirkpatrick, Outgoing Daily Free Press Editor-in-Chief at BU

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Outgoing Daily Free Press editor-in-chief Sarah Kirkpatrick at Boston University recently summed up the rigors facing student journalists with compelling candor. As part of a letter announcing her exit as EIC, Kirkpatrick offered a glimpse into the college media battle royale between technology and tradition, the classroom and the newsroom and idealism and reality.

As she shared, “At this very moment in time, I would argue, student journalists are caught in one of the most difficult situations of any type of student. We are asked to keep up with modern trends, and criticized by the traditionalists when we strive too far outside the box. We are asked to hold ourselves to the highest possible standards, and get scoffed at and feel defeated when we can’t do absolutely everything. We must put sufficient effort into our classes and work ridiculous hours on extracurricular publications to have a shot at any sort of future.” Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: Bits of Positivity

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

Podcast: Major Shift for Some Student Press Websites & a Retooled RebelMouse

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Welcome to the latest installment of the College Media Podcast. The CMP is a collaborative venture with Bryan Murley from the Center for Innovation in College Media.

The podcast’s aim: spotlighting big college media news, standout student press work and an array of helpful and innovative tips, sites, programs and tech tools. Read More

Media Guru: Print is Dying, Adults Must Stop Lying to Journalism Students About Its Potential

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Journalism innovation guru Clay Shirky believes print is a “wasting asset” and that students ignorantly, inaccurately believe in it because “adults [are] lying to them” about its long-term potential.

In a new blog post spreading like wildfire within the geeky journalism interwebs, Shirky rails against print nostalgists — adults in the media whose lingering attraction to ink stains and the way things were has blinded them to the realities of today’s and tomorrow’s news landscape.

He argues their nostalgia is infecting the next generation with a similarly warped belief that print will be — must be — OK in the long run even while all signs point to its “terminal decline.” Read More

30 Funniest Student Press Headlines of the Year

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Along with mounting investigations, raising important issues, innovating like mad and, umm, you know, going viral for writing about anal sex, the student press presented a rash of funny headlines this past academic year. Some headers mixed wit with a serious editorial point. Others offered top-notch satire. Still others found humor in brutal honesty. And a few were just scratch-your-head weird.

Below are 30 of my favorites. I stumbled across a large majority of them randomly. They made me smile, chuckle or genuinely laugh out loud. Most appeared in student newspapers or student humor magazines — at least the online editions — between June 2013 and June 2014. I’m not ranking them, but I did choose one grand prize winner. It’s at the very bottom of this rundown. The editor(s) who came up with it can proudly boast or run from the honor of the Funniest Student Press Headline of 2013-2014. Read More

Student Talk Show Pulled from Campus Radio Station After ‘Sexy Snapchats’ Fundraiser

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A below-the-belt effort to raise funds for the student radio station at California Polytechnic State University stirred some press attention late last semester and has forever tarred the station’s Google prints with words like genitals, butt holes and penis birthmark.

The 60-second rundown of this strange shenanigan: The two student hosts of “Getting It In,” a (weirdly-named) sex talk show on KCPR-FM at Cal Poly, decided to up the ante on the station’s fundraising by promoting a “sexy Snapchats” deal involving pictures of the pair’s penises and rectums. As they wrote on Facebook:

“For only $20 dollars you can have a week of sexy Snapchats featuring the hosts of ‘Getting It In.’ If you have ever been curious about which one of us has a birthmark on our penis or which one of us has a tighter butt hole, this is your chance to find out. Assemble $20 dollars of CASH ONLY (checks, gift cards or pre-paid credit cards will be shredded justly and promptly.)”

Read More

Student Newspaper Investigation Pierces Silence Surrounding Illegal Frats

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Lisa Khoury spent the past seven months examining a set of student groups at University of Buffalo that regularly deal drugs, haze pledges and party hard. They also technically “do not exist.”

Illegal fraternities are social organizations sharing almost everything in common with recognized Greek fraternities — except their official status. “They stay together after national organizations [shut them down],” Khoury explains. “They operate outside the system and protect their members’ identities by encircling themselves in a code of silence.”

Khoury, a recent graduate of the University of Buffalo and a former managing editor of UB’s independent student newspaper The Spectrum, attempted to pierce that silence with a 4,700-word investigation of illegal UB fraternities published earlier this month. Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: Warning, This Class May Offend You

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

College Media Podcast: Mourning vs. Reporting & Muck Rack’s New Link-Tracking Tool

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Welcome to the latest installment of the College Media Podcast. The CMP is a collaborative venture with Bryan Murley from the Center for Innovation in College Media.

The podcast’s aim: spotlighting big college media news, standout student press work and an array of helpful and innovative tips, sites, programs and tech tools. Read More

Student Journalist: ‘The 10 Commandments of Social Media’

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In an op-ed for The Daily Titan at California State University, Fullerton, David Coats lays out what he is proclaiming to be nothing less than “The 10 Commandments of Social Media.” On spec, it seems to be geared toward all Internet users, young and old, but it’s definitely most directly aimed at the college crowd.

As Coats puts it, “Learn it, live it, love it. It will make life easier and more enjoyable for everyone.”

Along with some lighthearted admonishments (“Thou shalt not post every meal ever consumed”) and generalities (“Thou shalt consider thy audience”), he includes two meatier, more significant rules I personally consider worth sharing to the student journalist set. Read More

Student Editor on Life as a College Journalist: ‘You Can Never Fully Accomplish Sanity’

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Amid the bevy of nearly-copycat editor and senior goodbye columns published in student newspapers and magazines over the past few months, a few have stood out as especially insightful, original or shake-my-head-in-agreement true.

Outgoing Daily Free Press editor-in-chief Sarah Kirkpatrick at Boston University wrote one of these standout send-offs last month. Read More

‘Who Gets a Press Pass?’: 5 Media Credentialing Challenges for Student Journalists

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How tough is it for student journalists to gain access to on and off campus events? When have they been denied a press pass or been granted one only after being subjected to uber-amounts of confusion or consternation about their student status? And how often do they simply give up before they have begun, deciding to not even ask for credentials because they’re flummoxed, intimidated or turned off by the process?

A high-profile new study of more than 1,300 journalists focused on “Media Credentialing Practices in the United States” had the potential to answer at least some of those questions. Alas, as Beatriz Costa-Lima reports for the Student Press Law Center, the otherwise fascinating survey does not include college journalists in the mix. Apparently, some students (unclear whether college or also younger) took part in the survey but not enough — so they were bumped to the “contributors or unpaid independent journalists” categories. Blah. Shrug. Grr. Read More

1 Million Story Ideas Special: Crowdsourcing Ideas for a Better Campus

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Over the past decade, digital tools and mobile platforms have rocketed journalism to a universe of innovation, interactivity and immediacy once unimaginable. Yet, without stellar content, journalism 2.0 is not worth the effort to read, watch, click on, scroll through, contribute to or connect with. Everything journalism was, is and will be rests on our ability to tell a story. And every story starts with an idea.

So let’s brainstorm. Read More

Student Column on Friend’s Assault, Victim vs. Survivor Debate Triggers Backlash

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A column last month in The Daily at the University of Washington about a student’s assault and the subsequent difference between responding to it as either a “victim” or a “survivor” inspired an outsized helping of viral hate. It also prompted the student writer to reflect and admit “my own words betrayed me.” And it has spurred a dialogue among the Daily crew about the proper use and contextual meaning of victim-survivor terminology.

In her original column, “Don’t Play the Blame Game: Be a Survivor,” Daily arts & leisure editor Danielle Palmer-Friedman tells the story of an assault her friend suffered at the hands of her partner. Her friend reported the assault to police. She felt guilty about this. Initially, Palmer-Friedman felt that guilt was justified — she deemed the involvement of police as unnecessarily cruel to the friend’s partner.

Then, her friend opened up to her: “I was the one who was hurt. I should not be the one feeling guilty. I was wronged, and it wasn’t wrong for me to report it.” Boom. Cue an about-face. According to Palmer-Friedman, “The sudden conviction in [my friend's] voice made something click in my brain. … Although it is still difficult for me to fully comprehend why, I know that what [my friend] did by reporting the assault was not wrong.” Read More

Harvard Radio Station Receives Complaints: ‘I’ve Never Heard the F-word This Much’

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The Federal Communications Commission has received three obscenity complaints about Harvard University’s radio station WHRB (95.3 FM) since 2011, according to documents released last week responding to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. All the complainants found fault with WHRB’s airing of uncensored rap song lyrics.

As one individual explained to the FCC, “Lyrics that included the words motherfucker, nigger, fuck, bitches and other gratuitous language was broadcast uncensored. I attempted to call the radio station but the telephone numbers provided on the WHRB website went unanswered.” Read More

The Koretzky Challenge: Can You Cover Your Campus Better Than a ‘Team of Old Farts’?

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Ever the provocateur, college media maven Michael Koretzky is on a mission “to compel college journalists to take online seriously” — even if he has to embarrass them a bit along the way.

His immediate target: the University Press, the Florida Atlantic University student newspaper he has advised — officially, unofficially and around the clock — the past 16 years.

Koretkzy has started a new news site “for the express purpose of shaming the University Press into doing better with its own. How? Public humiliation. Because nothing else has worked. Not hand-holding, not cajoling, not even bribery.”

The outlet — slyly named Fautocratic — features what Koretzky calls “random acts of journalism against Florida Atlantic University.” Yet, a second tagline lays out its aim more clearly: “Covering FAU news until the UP does.” Yowza. Game on. Read More

College Media Geeks: Jennifer Waits, College Radio Reporter & Advocate

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I met college radio guru Jennifer Waits for a lunchtime chat last Friday in The Coop eatery at Haverford College, her alma mater. She told me to search for a woman wearing a black tote bag sporting KFJC. They are the call letters of the college-based community radio station where she DJs, a pastime she adores. In her words, “It’s an addiction. I have to DJ. … When you’re DJing to FM airwaves, you’re DJing into space. There’s no feeling like it.”

I’d caught Waits on a break from an all-day stint in the Haverford archives. She is piecing together the fascinating history of the college’s student radio adventures, which stretch back to the 1920s. Read More