Pitt News Sex Edition Explores ‘Many Dimensions of Sexuality,’ Love & ‘Kissy Lips’

It’s Valentine’s Day.  At the University of Pittsburgh, that means lots of sex.  Now in its fifth year, The Pitt News Sex Edition annually delivers sweet, jarring, and kinky features on every sexual fetish, innuendo, and instrument fit for man and beast.

It is editorial intercourse of the highest order, aiming to “supply [readers] with information and foster a dialogue.”  As Pitt News editor-in-chief Amy Friedenberger writes near the start of the issue, “Men and women can read ‘Fifty Shades of Grey,’ but the novel doesn’t provide an accurate representation of sadomasochism.”

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Leave that to the Pitt News.  Along with S&M, polyamory, asexuality, the history of the bra, and sex in rom coms and video games all grab column inches.

In addition, a fascinating commentary by assistant opinions editor Nick Stamatakis attempts to answer the eternal question, “Why don’t people have sex as much as they say they do?”  As he writes, “Among leisure activities, sex might have one of the best cost-benefit ratios. . . . The benefits are well-documented: Lower stress, higher immunity, improved heart health, more self-esteem, and better sleep can all be linked to increased sexual activity. . . . And yet, when compared to other leisure activities, we don’t actually have that much sex.”

Meanwhile, the most memorable quote of the issue– and possibly the decade– appears in a feature focused on the laws of sexual attraction.  As a male student gushes about his girlfriend, “Her lips are naturally puckered– I say that she has ‘kissy lips.’  Even when she’s not trying to give a kiss, it looks like she’s getting ready to give a kiss, and it makes my mind jump to kissing her.  I associate the kissy lips with getting kisses.”

For her part, Friedenberger acknowledges the issue may be associated with some controversy.  “Readers may be taken aback at the photos of their peers in skimpy clothing,” she writes.  “Or perhaps stories about sadomasochism and birth control on campus make some people uncomfortable.  It’s easy, like many controversial topics, to just not talk about them.  But by talking openly we’re addressing a topic in order to respect individual experiences, beliefs, and identities.  Putting this issue of the newspaper together, we’re reminded of the many dimensions of sexuality there are to explore, so let these stories serves as a starting point for a candid discussion with peers.”

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Valentine’s Day Special: Pitt News Publishes Annual Sex Edition

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