Daily Californian Loses Fight for Student Funding Help– on a Technicality

The Daily Californian lost its fight to secure student funding help, on a technicalityAs I previously posted, Daily Cal editors had been working with the student senate at the University of California, Berkeley, to organize a campus-wide vote asking students to approve a $2-per-semester-per-student fee to financially assist the struggling paper.

Earlier this week, staff appealed to students with a special front-page editorial declaring “We Need Your Help.”  The page also featured a blank top-of-the-fold.  According to the paper’s editor-in-chief Tomer Ovadia, the white space was a symbolic example of what would be missing from reader’s lives if the Daily Cal ceased to exist.  It has become a more genuine concern in recent years as revenue troubles have led to cutbacks in page size, staff pay, and the number of issues printed each week.

Students had begun voting, a San Francisco Chronicle report confirms, “[b]ut one day into the elections, Vishalli Loomba, president of the Associated Students of the University of California, issued an executive order saying the referendum violated a UC policy to not give student fees to a non-university organization without a written memo affiliating it more closely with the campus.  Such a memo would impact the Daily Cal‘s independence and financial oversight, the order said.”

Basically, there are lingering concerns about how little the Daily Cal has explained regarding the staff’s plan to utilize the money.  Loomba: “There has been a painful lack of disclosure about what the fee entails.”

Comments
One Response to “Daily Californian Loses Fight for Student Funding Help– on a Technicality”
Trackbacks
Check out what others are saying...
  1. […] As I previously posted, revenue troubles have plagued the Daily Cal for a number of years. It has led to cutbacks in page size, staff pay and the number of issues printed each week. In spring 2012, the paper requested a special $2-per-semester-per-student fee to help keep its economic hopes afloat. […]



Leave A Comment