UPIU a ‘Mini-Internship’ of International Proportions

Suleiman Abdullahi was recently an eyewitness to the birth of the world’s newest nation.

In early January, the 20-year-old Kenyan journalism student flew to Juba, Sudan, to cover the massive referendum responsible for the creation and upcoming independence of South Sudan. As Abdullahi wrote, he arrived in the prospective nation’s capital city with a travel visa, a press pass, a story budget, and a 48-hour window to interview, observe, and report upon “the history that was about to be made.”

By the end of his first day, he was under arrest.

Suleiman Abdullahi reported from Juba, Sudan for UPIU and UPI during the historic referendum responsible for creating South Sudan.

Abdullahi was part of a two-man student reporting crew hired by UPIU, a student journalism project run by the United Press International news service. UPIU is an emerging player in the college media and journalism education arenasIts website features a self-publishing platform for news stories and multimedia journalism projects posted by students around the globe.

The most standout aspect of UPIU: It does not just publish content by students; it provides classroom workshops, story editing, and one-on-one mentoring to help their pieces sing. The students who take advantage of its services undergo what UPIU senior mentor Krista Kapralos calls a “mini-internship experience.”

It currently partners with more than 30 schools in roughly a dozen countries, leading to a cluster of student-produced stories touching on things such as Kenyans and antibiotic resistance, Moroccans and Christianity, the Chinese and homosexuality, and Egyptians and a revolution. The UPIU motto: “Mentoring Student Journalists Worldwide.”

“We want to leverage UPI’s solid reputation to attract aspiring journalists and improve foreign coverage,” said UPIU Asia regional director Harumi Gondo. “I’ve not encountered another program that has such direct communication and relationships with journalism schools around the world.”

No contracts are signed. UPIU does not collect any revenue from the posted stories. Students retain ownership of their work and are free to submit elsewhere. In the meantime, their content is vetted by professionals and considered for pick-up by UPI. Since its creation in late 2008, more than 2,300 stories have been published on the site. More than 100– roughly 4 percent of all submissions– have been approved for placement on UPI.com.

I can personally vouch for its potential. I have incorporated UPIU into multiple sections of my news reporting classes at the University of Tampa to mostly positive results. The process is five-fold: 1) an introductory video chat with each class hosted by veteran journalist Kapralos, who oversees UPIU’s initiatives in Africa, Europe, and the Americas; 2) an optional video session in which students pitch story ideas; 3) a critique from a UPIU mentor on subsequent story drafts students post to the site; 4) a video chat round-up with Kapralos commenting on the quality of submissions overall; and 5) revisions by the students based on the feedback from Kapralos and, of course, their professor.

Students’ involvement with UPIU ultimately helps underscore the lessons I am teaching them– if nothing else, the importance of a news hook, timeliness, editorial collaboration, and three-source minimums.

It also has served as the platform for award-winning work. In fall 2009, Michigan State University student Jeremy Blaney earned a Religion Newswriters Association honor for his reports on local Muslim issues that were published on UPIU and, soon after, UPI. The headline of one of his pieces, which touched on the intersection of Islam and technology was, “You’re a Muslim? There’s an App for That.”

“When you’re on our site, you’re not only seeing students practicing journalism,” Kapralos told a news-writing class during a recent video chat. “You’re also seeing a lot of really groundbreaking work. And you’re seeing it through a lens that you don’t always see through the New York Times or CNN.”

To Read the Rest of the Piece, Check Out PBS MediaShift

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