Chicago St. Censorship: Tempo Court Case Continues

A mini-major student press victory has emerged from a federal courtroom in Chicago.  According to a Student Press Law Center news flash, and a separate Courthouse News Service report, a judge has ruled that a former editor and former faculty adviser of The Tempo at Chicago State University may continue their lawsuit against the school over alleged administrative censorship.

As the SPLC shares, “The suit accuses the school of multiple activities to censor and disrupt Tempo publication, leading to the cancellation of multiple issues. [The former student editor] alleges the school’s hostility led him to resign from his post as editor and ultimately drop out of school. He and [the former faculty adviser] claim the school harassed, censored and ultimately fired [the adviser] due to his lack of content censorship over the controversial paper, robbing the paper of its adviser.”

The judge called Tempo content “constitutionally-protected expression,” a bold redirect from the 2005 Hosty v. Carter ruling that gave admins. broad censorship rights over college journalism on par with those impacting high school journalism. The case will now go to a jury trial.

My take: Bravo.  The acts of censorship carried out by Chicago State administrators disrupted the tempo of the school’s student press.  They deserve an official judicial reprimand.  This ruling is an important step in the fight to see that happen.  The bottom line: College and high school news media are different.  Both are laboratories of learning, but at the college level students are in control.  They deserve freedom and protection, advising and ultimate consent, room to grow and space to fail.

Comments
2 Responses to “Chicago St. Censorship: Tempo Court Case Continues”
Trackbacks
Check out what others are saying...
  1. […] Since the Press Act was a response to Hosty in Illinois, it didn’t reverse or affect the case’s ruling in Wisconsin and Indiana. This was still a major victory for college journalism in Illinois. The Act went through its first major test in 2009 at College of DuPage, when Trustees Kory Atkinson and David Carlin revised the Board Policy Manual to put the Courier student newspaper under President Robert Breuder’s control. The Courier printed an editorial stating that this move would be a violation of the Press Act and the editor spoke at the Board meeting protesting the proposed changes to the manual. As a result, many of the policy changes were removed, including the clause that put student publications under Breuder’s control. Also in 2009, Chicago State University Tempo editor George Providence II and his adviser Gerian Moore applied the Press Act to a lawsuit against the university, which it claims to have censored and disrupt the newspaper’s publication. That case is still in progress. […]

  2. […] Since the Press Act was a response to Hosty in Illinois, it didn’t reverse or affect the case’s ruling in Wisconsin and Indiana. This was still a major victory for college journalism in Illinois. The Act went through its first major test in 2009 at College of DuPage, when Trustees Kory Atkinson and David Carlin revised the Board Policy Manual to put the Courier student newspaper under President Robert Breuder’s control. The Courier printed an editorial stating that this move would be a violation of the Press Act and the editor spoke at the Board meeting protesting the proposed changes to the manual. As a result, many of the policy changes were removed, including the clause that put student publications under Breuder’s control. Also in 2009, Chicago State University Tempo editor George Providence II and his adviser Gerian Moore applied the Press Act to a lawsuit against the university, which it claims to have censored and disrupt the newspaper’s publication. That case is still in progress. […]



Leave A Comment