College Media Matters to relaunch

It has been more than a year since college media lost one of its great champions.

Dan Reimold covered college media with care, depth and positivity. Through his website, College Media Matters, he highlighted the amazing work of college media, shone the spotlight on its leaders and championed for innovation.

His passing has left a void in that coverage.

Today, College Media Association is proud to announce that College Media Matters will soon resume coverage. This relaunch comes with the blessing of Dan’s family, who reached out to CMA in hopes of continuing his legacy. No one knows how Dan juggled his teaching, advising and site duties; he was pretty amazing. So, CMA has put together a team of writers from across the country who hope to cover college media and the unique issues its faces.

The plan is for College Media Matters to return after Thanksgiving break. Candace Baltz of Oregon State University and Jim Rodenbush of Colorado State University will serve as editors in chief. Do you have a story idea? Would you like to contribute? They can be reached here.

 

How I Got the Job: 7 Questions Answered About Becoming a TV Reporter

Joe Little is a reporter for 10 News in San Diego. Photo credit: Joe Little

Everyone takes a different path to their first media job. Some people land their first choice right out of college. Others need to apply to dozens of places before landing an interview. There’s not a perfect way to get the job you want, but it can help to learn from the experience of others. This week: Joe Little, a reporter for 10 News in San Diego, and master of the one-man-band standup.

What got you interested in a TV career?
I was a jock in high school and college. And, like most meatballs who need to be the center of attention, I wanted to be on SportsCenter. I loved Dan Patrick and wanted to be just like him.

Do you remember what you included on your first tape?
Depends on which tape you’re talking about. I made one to get into graduate school (and it sucked) and I made one to get my first job in Hagerstown, Maryland (and it sucked). I posted both videos on YouTube.

In your career, how many rejections did you get?
I saved them all. I think I actually received more than a dozen rejection letters. I think I didn’t even get a courtesy rejection letter a dozen more times.

What’s your advice for a reporter struggling to land their first job?
Besides sending your resume to employers, send your resume to mentors who can critique your resume. You may be doing it all wrong. But most importantly, never give up. Stay active. Interact with people via social media at the stations you are applying. Do anything you can to get your name on the desk of a News Director.

As you have moved up to bigger markets, what changes do you notice in the way larger stations look for reporters?
I don’t know if it’s exactly larger stations looking for something different. I think all stations are looking for employees who have multiple skills. You are screwed if you are a one-trick-pony.

In your experience, what are the things young reporters overlook about their tape, or in their search?
I think too many reporters aren’t realists. You’re not going to work in a top 50, maybe even a top 100 market out of college. Very, very, very few people do. Simple things don’t help either. Never put someone else on your tape (co-anchors, anchor tosses, other reporters, etc.). No one is impressed you interviewed a celebrity. Even fewer people want to hear the celebrity’s answer.

What was the one thing about a TV news job search you wish someone would have told you in college?
Don’t suck.

Are Student Media Still on Instagram?

1Current and recent student journalists, journalism professors, student media advisers and news media professionals tackled this topic during a recent #collegemedia Twitter chat. For more insights and advice from the regular chats, check out the #collegemedia live chat page.

Read More

Join #collegemedia Live Chat This Sunday August 16th at 7 p.m. EST

1This Sunday night, join the #collegemedia live chat. Stop by Twitter starting at 7 p.m. EST for a fun, free-flowing, hour-long discussion about college media, new media, millennials and the future of journalism.

Read More

Why Should Students Still Study Journalism Given the Sorry State of the News Industry? Here is the Perfect Answer via 1 Chart & a 90-Second Clip

I am often asked to defend the very existence of journalism education. If you’re reading this, you most likely know exactly what I mean — either because you have been asked to do the same thing or because you are the one doing the asking.

To be clear, nowadays, it’s an extremely fair, and even needed, question. After all, the industry as a whole — and especially its local news backbone — is cutting losses and shedding jobs at a sadly prodigious rate. At the same time, students (and their families) are spending insane amounts and piling up gigantic debt in pursuit of a higher education degree. As a parent pessimistic about his son’s journalism interest once put it to me, “It’s a heap of money we don’t really have for a career I’m not confident will be waiting for him.” (He then asked if I could autograph a copy of my textbook, a request so weirdly timed I actually laughed, thinking he was joking.)

I have my own version of a serious defense to this question/concern, which, yes, I can recite with sincere (guarded) optimism. As my loyal readers know, it’s also a question I often ask the student journalists, professors and professionals I interview — in part simply to see if my own spirited rallying cry is still at least marginally on point and in line with the thinking of others across the journalism education spectrum.

I recently came across two additional showings of support for this defense. The first is featured in a massive — and massively significant — new survey conducted by the American Press Institute. It’s only been out a few days, but anyone even remotely geeky about journalism has surely at least pretended to read some of it by now.

Above and beyond its many other fascinating findings, the one that has proven most newsworthy and of interest to me: A surprisingly high percentage of professionals who graduated over the past decade from U.S. journalism schools consider themselves journalists today — even those who work in industries and jobs that may on spec seem unrelated or only slightly related to the old school notion of journalism.

1

I’ll spare you the pablum and cut right to the heart of that awesomeness: Journalism is not confined to a single field in the 21st century. And it is surely not confined to a particular set of job titles or type of work. The former j-students now impacting all corners of commerce, politics, the law, education, technology and media are telling us one thing loudly and collectively: The skills and knowledge they gleaned from their j-education is still so strongly embedded within them that, even beyond what their industry or position descriptions may say, at their core they know they are journalists.

I’ll put it another way: Journalism, more than ever, is now everywhere, impacting the way the world is shaped and seen, inside and out.

And the key here is the education component. Because in a world in which everyone can be journalists, or at least say they are, it will be those with the real journalistic training and knowledge who will rise above and be recognized and (hopefully) over time financially rewarded.

This is at the heart of a brief aside made by Sree Sreenivasan during a talk this summer to kick off CUNY’s annual Social Media Weekend. I’ve embedded the YouTube video below to start at the exact spot he dives into his “why journalism” spiel.

“Journalism is not dying. Journalism is more robust than ever before.”

Sree Sreenivasan ~

Why journalism? According to Sreenivasan, the chief digital officer at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and former longtime faculty member at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, there is more journalism being produced on more outlets and in more ways for more interested people than ever before. The business side is in flux, to be sure, like so many industries in this age of transition. But that is only a current problem needing a long-term solution, not a reason to turn away from an education and life centered on meaningful content creation, storytelling, sharing and engaging.

20+ Examples of Inspirational Journalism

Current and recent student journalists, journalism professors, student media advisers and news media professionals tackled this topic during a recent #collegemedia Twitter chat. For more insights and advice from the regular chats, check out the #collegemedia live chat page.

Read More

New Mexico State Student Media Reinvention: After 100+ Years as a Newspaper, Is Switch to Monthly Magazine the Right Move?

Starting in the fall, The Round Up weekly student newspaper at New Mexico State University will appear as Oncore monthly magazine.

For college media geeks, the report about the upcoming change in The Santa Fe New Mexican is extremely interesting for the blatant in-fighting on display. Specifically, there are on-the-record digs from a former Round Up staffer, the NMSU journalism department chair and the paper’s outgoing adviser.

Their concerns: The feature-focused magazine won’t be a needed newsy watchdog. In a related sense, the Round Up has grown gun-shy about tackling the tough stuff and this shift is more evidence of that. Students will have less opportunities to dive into deadline-oriented rough-and-tumble journalism. And the move is being made without input and support from several interested outside constituencies (including j-profs, Round Up alumni and the NMSU community as a whole). Read More

What Happened When UVA’s Student Newspaper Told Its Former Staffers We Need $55,000 ASAP

The Cavalier Daily at the University of Virginia recently faced an outstanding $55,000 rent bill for its newsroom space and no way to pay it. The subsequent forced move would have been rough. According to The Washington Post, “Instead of a 2,100-square-foot office, the staff of more than 100 students would share one measuring only 380 square feet.”

So editors made an impassioned plea to the paper’s alumni. The result, only 14 hours later: Rent paid, in full. Or at least the ability for the paper to pay its rent via pledged donations, including one individual who apparently gave $20,000. Read More

Tough Times & Big Changes for Virginia Tech Student Media

The Collegiate Times at Virginia Tech is dropping to twice-weekly in print come fall, one of the many changes — big and small — being instituted by its parent company in hopes of surviving “amid the storm clouds of this financial crisis.”

The Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech (EMCVT) oversees the school’s student newspaper, yearbook, literary mag, radio station and broadcast operation. As I previously posted, it has been floundering financially, recently lost at least three professional staff members including its general manager and has been mired in an odd controversy involving the sudden removal of the CT’s editor-in-chief.

Read More

30+ Pieces of Essential Advice for Every Student Journalist

1Current and recent student journalists, journalism professors, student media advisers and news media professionals tackled this topic during a recent #collegemedia Twitter chat. For more insights and advice from the regular chats, check out the #collegemedia live chat page.

Read More

Join #collegemedia Live Chat This Sunday August 9th at 7 p.m. EST

1This Sunday night, join the #collegemedia live chat. Stop by Twitter starting at 7 p.m. EST for a fun, free-flowing, hour-long discussion about college media, new media, millennials and the future of journalism.

Read More

College Media Podcast: Claire Smith, Editor-in-Chief, The Daily Texan, U. of Texas at Austin

Claire Smith is a rising senior at the University of Texas at Austin and the editor-in-chief of The Daily Texan student newspaper. She previously served the paper as a senior columnist and copy editor.

For this edition of the College Media Podcast, recorded last week at the University of Georgia during the annual Management Seminar for College News Editors (MSCNE), Smith discusses the complexities of covering a trio of stories — a recent alum’s death, an ongoing Confederate statue controversy and a “joke” student government campaign. She also offers advice to new and prospective student journalists about the importance of continually flexing the writing muscle and bonding with your student media colleagues — even when on deadline.

To listen in, click here or anywhere on the image embedded below. To check out the full College Media Podcast stream, click here.

American U. Journalist Arrested in Ferguson Settles Civil Rights Lawsuit, Has Charges Dropped

1

Last month, I wrote about reporting wunderkind Trey Yingst, an independent journalist based in Washington D.C. and the founder of the news service News2share.com. Yingst, 21, balances a full courseload at American University with basically nonstop reporting on U.S. and international riots, protests, armed conflicts, political events and areas of unrest.

One of those areas has been Ferguson, Missouri, where Yingst traveled twice in the past year — first after Michael Brown’s death and then again in November in the wake of the grand jury decision involving police officer Darren Wilson. During that latter visit, law enforcement arrested Yingst and charged him with unlawful assembly, failure to obey a lawful order and interfering with the duties of a police officer. Read More

Tips for Student Media Covering This Week’s GOP Presidential Primary Debate

1Current and recent student journalists, journalism professors, student media advisers and news media professionals tackled this topic during a recent #collegemedia Twitter chat. For more insights and advice from the regular chats, check out the #collegemedia live chat page. Read More

Harvard Student Humor Magazine Tricks Donald Trump with Fake Presidential Endorsement

1

College media have officially entered the 2016 presidential race.

In the best bit of tomfoolery to hit the campaign so far, The Harvard Lampoon tricked leading GOP (joke) candidate Donald Trump into believing he was receiving a serious presidential endorsement.

Staffers at the venerable Harvard University student humor magazine apparently told Trump’s people they were ready to publicly endorse him for president — all while pretending to be members of The Harvard Crimson campus newspaper.

Trump took the bait, posing for an instantly-iconic thumbs-up photo with the Lampoon team. The pic is now online, accompanying a full-on parody editorial headlined “Crimson Endorses Trump for President.” Read More

Best College Newspapers: 2015 Ranking Released by Princeton Review

1

My sincere congrats to staffers, advisers and alums of the pubs that made the cut for Princeton Review’s 2015 “Best College Newspaper” Ranking. Just please promise me you will at least step back for a single moment and deep-dive into the absurdity of the selection process. (And for those whose papers were left out, learning about the process will make you feel better, I swear.)

Read More

Tabloid in Print, Tiled Online: The Reinvention of The Daily Wildcat at the University of Arizona

Later this month, The Daily Wildcat at the University of Arizona will officially unveil its new identity — sleeker in design, more responsive online and on mobile and more digitally-friendly in the newsroom.

In a new College Media Podcast chat, Daily Wildcat editor-in-chief Jessie Webster lays out the details behind the components at the core of the outlet’s reinvention. The main four:

1) A cutback in print from daily to thrice-weekly.

2) A print redesign built around tabloid.

3) The creation of new staff positions — including digital editors for every section — and some related newsroom workflow adjustments.

4) A redesigned website set to embody the tiled design scheme of sites like Pinterest. Read More

Let’s Talk Tabloid: Tips for Shifting to a Tabloid-Sized Paper (Part 5, Final Tabloid Tips)

1In the midst of massive reinvention across college media, many student newspapers are considering making the switch to a tabloid-sized paper in print. What are the advantages, challenges and surprises that come with shifting to tabloid? And what are some tips to help make the transition as seamless as possible for reporters, editors, designers and readers?

During a recent College Media Podcast chat, Claire Dodson, outgoing editor-in-chief of The Daily Beacon student newspaper at the University of Tennessee, offered advice while sharing the story of how the Beacon reinvented as a tabloid this past semester. Read More

Join #collegemedia Live Chat This Sunday August 2nd at 7 p.m. EST

1This Sunday night, join the #collegemedia live chat. Stop by Twitter starting at 7 p.m. EST for a fun, free-flowing, hour-long discussion about college media, new media, millennials and the future of journalism.

Read More

Let’s Talk Tabloid: Tips for Shifting to a Tabloid-Sized Paper (Part 4, Tabloid Staffing & Workflow)

1In the midst of massive reinvention across college media, many student newspapers are considering making the switch to a tabloid-sized paper in print. What are the advantages, challenges and surprises that come with shifting to tabloid? And what are some tips to help make the transition as seamless as possible for reporters, editors, designers and readers?

During a recent College Media Podcast chat, Claire Dodson, outgoing editor-in-chief of The Daily Beacon student newspaper at the University of Tennessee, offered advice while sharing the story of how the Beacon reinvented as a tabloid this past semester. Read More